#47 – Bike the Kinsol Trestle

The Kinsol Trestle is part of the Cowichan Valley Trail route and is a spectacular timber rail trestle standing 145 feet tall, 614 feet in length, on a 7degree curve. The Cowichan Valley Regional District, the Province of BC, and the Canadian Government preserved the trestle to connect the trail systems across the river to continue the Trans Canada Trail but more importantly to preserve the history of the mining and logging industries. It stands above the salmon bearing Koksilah River.

Trestle

Kinsol Trestle Cowichan Valley

Read more about the History of the Kinsol Trestle.

Bikers

The rail bed is now a compact gravel trail and is perfect for bikers, hikers, runners and equestrians to enjoy, no matter the weather. The trails are endless and you can go in either direction from the trestle. We learned that eventually this trail will hook up to the Galloping Goose trail in Victoria. Another item on my list. We choose the south trail that paralleled Shawnigan Lake. There is nothing better then being able to bike for miles away from traffic, listening to birds, the sounds of the streams, and watching the scenery unfold.

Shawnigan Lake

Shawnigan Lake

We met 2 young gals walking their horses and pet goats named Cloudy and Rainy. The goats responded to commands like “smile”, “show your teeth”, “play shy”. Too funny!

Equestrians

After a pleasant ride along the lake, we enjoyed a beautiful bottle of Rosé and a superb and delicious meal at the Unsworth Winery in Coble Hill. I think the pictures say it all.

Unsworth

Advertisements

14 thoughts on “#47 – Bike the Kinsol Trestle

  1. What a great adventure! I think it would take courage to bike over a trestle like that, but uplifting! Canada has grandeur no doubt! We’ve stayed in Banff, which was part of Trans Continental Railroad. I don’t know if that’s part of the same trail. I’m not very knowledgable on the subject.

    Like

    • Yes it is. The Trans Canada Trail is 75% complete connecting East to West. They hope to have it all completed by July 2017. The trestle is intimidating at first. If you are not afraid of heights you can stand in these little perches and look down.

      Like

Your turn to comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s